The Very Best and Worst Movie Remakes

As we look forward to all the up and coming live-action Disney movie remakes, we thought we’d take a look back at a few movie remakes from the last few years, and ask the question whether or not they should have been.

The Jungle Book 1967 vs 2016

Kicking things off in style we’ll look at the live-action remake of one of the earliest Disney movies, The Jungle Book.

As we swing into the deep dark jungle, we love the fact that none of the fun was lost.

Characters like King Louis and Baloo the bear and their songs were kept in, and the casting for our favourite characters was spot on. Even Shere Khan was made to be just as terrifying as he was in the original cartoon, with Idris Elba providing a very convincing tiger-like performance.

This movie remake gets a thumbs up from us, as none of the original magic was lost and we got a little more back story about man’s relationship with the jungle.

Lion King 1994 vs 2019

Released July 2019, this hotly-anticipated epic has been met with rave reviews so far.

Although said to be a lot darker than the original cartoon, using the underlying Shakespearian story as more of an influence, the new live-action Lion King is as gripping as the animated Disney version but a lot more serious.

The downside is the real version takes away a lot of the warm and fuzzy feelings Disney created, although, the astonishing reality of CGI creatures and their epic surroundings is said to be astounding..

It’s safe to say that most live-action Disney remakes are building on amazing originals, it’d be hard for them to make a worse movie remake of such popular animated classics.

Cinderella 1965 vs 2015

The fairy-tale of Cinderella was begging to be one of the first Disney movie remakes if only to see how they recreated that dress and of course the glass slippers.

Sadly, this was perhaps the only good thing about this movie remake.

The rest of the film, although kept close to the original animated version story, seemed to take away from the sadness of poor cinders instead of adding anything new to it.

Lily James’ beauty and her pre-ball transformation are literally the only things that brought the original whimsy and magic to the movie.

Even Helena Bonham Carter couldn’t resuscitate the limp dialogue, which has to say something about how poor the rest was.

This Disney movie remake was a treat for the eyes as far as production, scenery and special effects go, but whether it brought an ounce of the original Cinderella Disney magic to the table is left to be said.

Aladdin 1992 vs 2019

Sometimes things are best left untouched, and with the likes of Disney’s Aladdin, many agreed with this sentiment.

People were concerned that the part of the Genie couldn’t possibly be close to or better than the one voiced by Robin Williams in the 1992 animated classic.

Then people discovered the wonder and amazement from the animated movie had indeed been captured and enhanced using amazing CGI and some clever storytelling.

As far as the genie goes, Will Smith makes the part his own, whilst still giving a nod to Robin Williams’ work as well. Smith brought his cheeky comedic nature to the genie and his flare and character were easily adapted to the role.

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In short Aladdin, the live-action movie remake was every bit as exciting and action-packed as the animated role, with extra snippets put in to bring the film into the modern age.

Total Recall 1990 vs 2012

As one of the greatest B movies of all time, Total Recall is a movie remake we wish had never happened, full stop.

There is only one Arnold Schwarzenegger after all, and of course, his wonderful wooden performance is what makes the entire movie.

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The well-timed one-liners, 90s style settings, awful special effects and a kick-ass performance from Sharon Stone are what made this a likeable movie in the firstplace and it’s all missing from the next version.

Changing the setting of Mars for a dystopian version of earth and adding in plenty of political messages, predicting the future of the world, took the movie so far away from it’s original, they should have just made a new film altogether.

In conclusion, whilst the movie remake of Total Recall is acceptably watchable, it’s by no means a better version of the original.

Beauty and The Beast 1991 vs 2017

From the very first scene, you get the sense that movie makers have done their best to stick to the original screenplay word for word, scene by scene.

Emma Watson isn’t your stereotypical Hollywood girl. The smart, strong-minded woman and gifted actress may have seemed a strange casting choice at first, but Watson’s feisty character is exactly what was needed for the success of this Disney movie remake.

After Watson, the rest of the star-studded cast brought the most magical and memorable moments from the original to life.

We loved the newest Beauty and the Beast even if others put it on their list of the worst movie remakes of all time.

The Italian Job 1969 vs 2018

Even though it’s known as one of the greatest British films of all time, The Italian Job has less adrenaline-pumping moments than an episode of Paw Patrol.

Our favourite Brit actor, Michael Caine spends a while building up the suspense, living the life of a 007 style secret agent after being released from a stint in jail. The main crux of the film is the heist and car chase which, could have done with a heavy injection of urgency and drama and a bit more of a chase.

Cut to the 2003 remake and we’ve got a fully Americanised version of the dull British classic, including all-American Marky Mark in the leading role.

Where the original Italian Job was a bit dull, the revisited movie remake sees the iconic convoy of minis go zipping through streets and underground tunnels.

The original is a classic film that will forever be remembered for the line,

“You’re only supposed to blow the bloody doors off!”

And whilst the modern movie remake might not be remembered, it certainly has a lot more to attract audiences as far as action, character development and storylines go.

Texas Chainsaw Massacre 1974 vs 2003

From the grainy 1974 version of this terrifying horror to today’s many movie remakes, retakes and sequels Texas Chainsaw Massacre have been done to death making the new movies a lot less scary than the original.

The original version takes us by surprise, this was one of the first horror movies of its kind, catching audiences unawares with the Leatherface character and barely giving any hints about the horrors that awaited the travelling teens.

By the time the movie remakes appeared, audiences were more than familiar with masked psychotic killers, including Leatherface, Jason in his Hockey mask and Michael Myers from Halloween.

The difference with these and the originals is that the surface terror of the later movie remakes is never scarier than the implied terror from the original film.

Just like Alfred Hitchcock’s movies, the first Texas Chainsaw Massacre was all in the build-up of suspense and surprise.

Things are still shocking in the movie remakes of Texas Chainsaw Massacre, but they’ve been given a Hollywood polish that takes away from the psychological terror of the original.

Godzilla 1954 vs 2019

How many times can one movie be remade?

From 1954 until the present day there have been too many Godzilla sequels and remakes to even discuss, so we’ll stick to the big ones.

The original 1954 was a defining movie moment, creating the effect of suitmation, where a stunt man would walk among miniature sets giving the illusion of a giant in a regular size world.

Cut ahead nearly 45 years and stuntmen are replaced with CGI, making Godzilla’s return impressive, large scale and blockbusting.

Fast forward again another decade or so and the 30th Godzilla movie returns to screens, bigger and better than ever. This time following the original story laid down by Toho, Godzilla’s original creators.

This movie remake has since sparked Toho to produce Godzilla: King of the Monsters, released in May 2019 and we can look forward to another sequel in the near future, Godzilla VS King Kong.

Suffice to say that each of the Godzilla films brings something different to the table, from pioneering effects and the start of a decade-spanning series to promises of exciting future monster battles.

All the Godzilla’s get thumbs up in our books.

Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory 1971 vs 2005

Okay, so we know it’s hard to diss anything that stars Johnny Depp, but Willy Wonka didn’t need to be remade, period.

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The magic and whimsy of the original film were merely replaced by weird and whacky, taking away the sugary sweetness of Roald Dahl’s original story.

Even the oom-pah Loompa’s were ruined.

The movie remake of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory just goes to show that newer isn’t always better, regardless of your casting choices and budgets.

Carrie 1976 vs 2013

Another amazing cult classic, Carrie the original certainly was a spine-tingler if there ever was one.

Highlighting the devastating effects of bullying and poor parenting, Stephen King’s first thrilling published novel was skilfully brought to life on screen in the 70s and suitably sacred audiences who watched.

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Of course, the movie remake didn’t quite have the same effects as the original, with all the modern movie sheen and polish, Carrie became less gritty and more glam.

Even Carrie herself, who in the novel was chubby and spotty, and in the first movie was waif-like and alienesque, was played by the gorgeous Chloe Mortez, making her highly unbelievable as an outcast.

Then there’s the telekinesis.

In the original movie this is a result of Carrie’s maltreatment, but in the remake becomes some sort of superpower which Mortez’s Carrie hones and perfects to wield as a weapon for the grand finale.

The remake of Carrie definitely moved with the times but again we raise the question, did it need to?

Annie 1982 vs 1999

It’s a Hard Knock Life in the first version of Annie, showing an unfortunate orphans rise to wealth and riches, from the slums of a prison-like orphanage amidst the Great Depression.

In the remake, writers changed the orphanage to a foster home and the drunk and abusive Miss Hannigan into a bitter, less threatening version of herself with Cameron Diaz in the role.

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It’s this change alone that seems to have taken away the feeling and emotion of the whole film, as the original showed the change little Annie made in everyone around her, including Miss Hannigan.

In the remake, to give the movie a solid PG friendly base, Miss Hannigan was not abusive or drunk and, aside from her bitterness, provided a safe environment for kids to grow up in.

When it all comes down to it Annie just wasn’t Annie without the crazy gin-drinking, flirty Miss Hannigan.

Sabrina 1954 vs 1995

When something stars Audrey Hepburn it should be a sign to leave it well alone.

The original Sabrina was a screaming success in 1954, starring none other than Humphrey Bogart and the stunning Hepburn as unlikely on-screen love interests.

Enter 1995 and filmmakers take another bash at reviving the movie that was already so perfect, to begin with, casting a relative nobody in the role of Sabrina and man of the moment, Harrison Ford as her older love interest.

Safe to say this version of the movie didn’t rock worlds, but it didn’t flop either, we just know that no one does it better than Audrey and no one ever could.

Little Shop of Horrors 1960 vs 1982

Not many people will realise that The Little Shop of Horrors, starring Rick Moranis and Steve Martin is actually a remake.

The first, filmed in the 60s, was said to be the product of a bet between brothers. Director Roger Corman made a wager with his brother, stating he could film a hit movie in one week. The results were an extremely low budget production that became a stage and screen phenomenon in later years.

Despite the 80s production of Little Shop of Horrors having a cast studded with stars and benefiting from a longer, more expensive filming situation, the earliest Little Shop of Horrors is responsible for inspiring one of the greatest cult movies of all time.

It may not be the best to watch but it’s responsible for the amazing things that followed.

Book Your Cinema and Stay this Summer

Make sure you’ve bagged your seats in the cinema this summer and catch the latest releases and more movie remakes yet to come.

Our Cinema and Stay offer includes an overnight stay for two adults and one child in any of our marvellous movie-themed rooms, cinema tickets and a tasty two-course meal, all for just £149.

Supplements apply for extra children and our superb city centre accommodation can cater to groups of 4-6 guests.

Call our team today on 0151 236 0166 or email info@signatureliving.co.uk to book your Cinema Stay with Arthouse Hotel.

11 of the Best Coming of Age Movies of All Time

When you’re feeling nostalgic, there’s nothing better than settling down with one of the best coming of age movies.

From 80s favourites to relatable films of recent years, we’ve put together the perfect list for a film day!

1) Clueless (1995)

This star-studded 90s hit is inspired by Jane Austen classic Emma. Telling the coming of age story of Cher Horowitz, Clueless follows a popular, rich High School student in Beverly Hills. When transfer student Tai joins the school, Cher takes the newcomer under her wing and sets out to give her a makeover. But as time goes on, Cher realizes that she herself may be the one who needs a makeover after all. One that reshapes how she sees the world and treats others.

 

2) Booksmart (2019)

One of the best new coming of age movies, Booksmart has been hailed the long-awaited ‘female version of Superbad’, and it’s easy to see why. This hilarious hit follows bookworm best friends, Amy and Molly. On the eve of their graduation, the girls realize they should have worked less and played more during high school. Aiming to fit four years worth of fun into one eventful night, this coming of age film will make you laugh out loud and shed a few tears.

 

3) Stand By Me (1986)

Without a doubt one of the best coming of age movies ever made, Stand By Me takes us back to the summer of 1959 in Castlerock, Oregon. This heartwarming, hilarious and moving tale brings Stephen King’s coming of age story The Body to life. A nostalgic tale of childhood freedom and adventure, the film follows four friends and their loss of their innocence as they embark on a life-changing search for a missing body.

 

4) Grease (1978)

When it comes to coming of age films, all-singing, all-dancing Grease is a hard one to beat. Bringing back the fashion and music of the late 1950s, this timeless musical is one of our all time favourites. The story follows bad-boy greaser Danny Zuko and sweet Australian Sandy Olsson, as they rekindle their summer romance amidst the social hierarchies and cliques of school. From the Pink Ladies to the T-Birds, it’s a tough world in the corridors of an american high school!

While you’re here, why not take a look inside our Grease-themed hotel room? 

 

5) Lady Bird (2017)

This Golden Globe-winning film had to be on our list of the best coming of age movies. One of the newer films on our list, Lady Bird is a heartwarming coming of age story with a mother-daughter bond at its heart. Set in 2002 in the scenic suburbs of Sacramento, Lady Bird tells the witty tale of  Christine “Lady Bird” MacPherson, a Catholic high school senior longing for adventure and escape. This is a fantastic film about growing up and discovering the comforts of home.

 

6) The Breakfast Club (1985)

The 80s was a good time for coming of age movies! And undoubtedly one of the very best is The Breakfast Club. This timeless cult classic tells the story of five high school students who meet in Saturday detention. Though they never normally cross paths, as the hours pass by the group discover that they more in common than they thought. As Andrew puts it, “We’re all pretty bizarre. Some of us are just better at hiding it, that’s all.”

 

7) An Education (2009)

One of our favourite coming of age stories is An Education, starring the UK’s very own Carey Mulligan. Set in the 1960s in suburban London, this fascinating film is inspired by a true story. Following sixteen year old Jenny, who dreams of being accepted into Oxford on her father’s wishes, Jenny’s life changes when she’s swept off her feet by David, an older man who introduces her to music, culture and a different way of life. However, as time goes on, Jenny learns that David might not be who she thought he was.

 

8) The Perks of Being a Wallflower (2012)

Adapted from the book of the same title, The Perks of Being a Wallflower follows Charlie, an introverted high school student who is taken under the wings of two carefree seniors. A funny, moving and relatable coming of age film, this memorable story deals with first love, friendship, mental illness and the trials and tribulations of being thrown into the real world. With a fantastic soundtrack featuring David Bowie, this is one we think will stand the test of time!

 

9) The Virgin Suicides (1999)

Bringing Jeffrey Eugenides’ novel of the same title to life, The Virgin Suicides is directed by Sofia Coppola, whose films are known for their dreamlike cinematography. The whimsical feel of this coming of age film fits perfectly with the coming of age story of the mysterious Lisbon sisters. Set in 1970s surburbia, this harrowing story follows a group of male friends who obsess over the girls and watch how their mundane, sheltered lives spiral towards teenage rebellion, romantic fantasies and fatal tragedy.

 

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10) Love, Simon (2018)

Love, Simon is one of the best coming of age movies to grace cinema screens over the last few years. The film tells the story of Simon Spier as he develops an online connection with a boy known as ‘Blue’. The boys confide in each other by email about their sexuality, which they’ve been keeping secret from their family and friends. Soon, Simon begins to wonder who ‘Blue’ could be, and sets out to uncover his identity, discovering more about himself along the way.

 

11) Superbad (2007)

best coming of age movies

It may have been made in the noughties, but Superbad is still one of the most hilarious and best coming of age movies to date. One of our favourite feel-good films, Superbad follows Seth and Evan during the last few weeks of high school. The witty duo are usually mocked by the cool kids, but manage to bag an invite to a party. As the night draws closer, the pair set out to stock up on alcohol and plot to  lose their virginity before college. With McLovin’ and two slow policemen tagging along, it’s safe to say things run less than smoothly along the way!

 

Book your stay today at Arthouse Hotel by heading to our booking page here. We offer the best available rate when you book direct with us. 

 

 

 

Memorable Mom Movie Moments from the Best Movie Mothers

Get snuggled up with mum on the couch this Mother’s Day and make your way through these classic mom movies with a bucket of tasty treats and a bottle of mum’s favourite plonk.

We’ve gathered all the greatest movie moments, from the cute and heartwarming to the scary and downright disturbing.

Here, in no particular order are the greatest mom movie moments of all time.

Mrs George

Aka: Regina’s Mum

Movie: Mean Girls

Mrs George makes it very clear from the get-go she’s not like a regular mom, she’s a cool Mom. Her velour tracksuit, blonde tresses and rocking bod certainly go a long way to confirm this.

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Our favourite mom movie moment:

Mrs George: Happy Hour is from 4-6!

Cady: Is there alcohol in this?

Mrs George: Oh god, no, honey, what kind of mother do you think I am? Why, do you want a little bit? Because if you’re gonna drink, I’d rather you do it in the house.

Amy Mitchell

Aka: The original Bad Mom

Movie: Bad Moms

The ultimate struggling mother trying to balance work, social life, love life and the dreaded PTA, Amy Mitchell is the most relatable movie mother we’ve encountered yet. She tells it like it is, lets loose and has a little fun with her newly found mummy mates.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

Arriving late to a PTA meeting, Amy decides to quit and starts a revolt against the PTA chairwoman eventually overthrowing the whole system.

Morticia Adams

Aka: Wednesday, Pugsley and Pubert’s mum

Movie: Adams Family and Adams Family Values

Although she may have a dark side, Morticia Adams is a devoted mother to her three unique children. She indulges their macabre games and encourages them to explore and celebrate the Adams’ individuality.

What more could you want from a mum?

Our favourite mom movie moment:

In Adams Family Values, when a curse falls upon Morticia’s family, and she’s reading to Pubert from The Cat in the Hat exclaiming when she reaches the end of the story

“Oh, no . . . he lives”

Celeste

Aka: Jessie’s alien stepmother

Movie: My Stepmother is an Alien

Who wouldn’t love a mother like Celeste whose alien bag can produce everything from fist-sized diamonds to designer clothes? She even makes Jessie fly at one point. Too cool.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

To fulfil the typical earth mom role, Celeste whips up every dish on the menu from the corner restaurant for breakfast. Even giving the dog, Dave, a selection of desserts and chicken wings in his bowl.

Bella Swan

Aka: Renesmee’s Mum

Movie: Twilight Breaking Dawn Part II

Bella Swan and Renesmee - mom movie moments

Of course, there’s no movie mother quite like Bella Swan. Giving birth to a half vampire half human baby, dying in the process only to be reborn as a vampire herself then taking on a legion of vampire lords to protect her newborn daughter.

That’s motherhood right there.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

After Bella wakes up and realises Jacob has imprinted on Renesmee and furiously throws him against a tree demonstrating her newborn vampire strength and her protective instincts.

Marge Simpson

Aka: Bart, Lisa and Maggie’s Mum

Movie: The Simpsons Movie

Over the decades Marge Simpson became everyone’s favourite cartoon mum, stuck forever with a teenage son, a genius daughter and an Alien baby.

When The Simpsons Movie was made, Marge resumed her role as the sane one in the group, continuing to keep the family together through thick and thin.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

Whilst cleaning and listening intently to Lisa describe her new boyfriend, Marge gives Lisa some sage advice about how important it is to find a man who listens to her. She is then cut off mid-sentence when she notices pig tracks on the ceiling and wonders how they got there.

Mrs Gump

Aka: Forrest’s mum

Movie: Forrest Gump

The most touching mother-son relationship of all movie time is the bond between Mrs Gump and Forrest. Throughout the film, her strength to give Forrest confidence in life makes her one of the greatest movie moms ever.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

My momma always said, “Life is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you’re gonna get.”

Molly Weasley

Aka: Ginny, Ron, Fred, George, Percy and Charlie’s mum

Movie: The Harry Potter Series

The greatest mum in the wizarding world award goes to Molly Weasley. Even though her kind welcoming presence is a reassurance that things will be okay throughout the film, Molly Weasley is not a mum to be trifled with and will not hesitate to blow up anyone who threatens her family.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

Sarah Connor

Aka: John Connor’s mum

Movie: Terminator 2

Sarah Connor is one of the most amazing movie mothers whose existence is tantamount to the entire Terminator franchise. From being hunted to becoming the hunter, Sarah Connor is a fierce warrior mother who battles for her and her son’s survival in a variety of time zones.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

When the T-1000 jabs Sarah in the shoulder with his finger that turns into a knife and tries to torture her for information. She just casually uses her one good arm to try and reload her big ass shotgun, blowing his non-existent nuts off then getting away to save her kid. Tough as nails!

Helen Parr

Aka: Dash and Violet’s mum

Movie: The Incredibles 1 & 2

Another cartoon mother we simply have to give snaps to. Helen Parr, the once great Elastigirl, now a mother of three amazing children gave up her excellent crime-stopping lifestyle to form a family.

In both Incredibles 1 & 2, Helen Parr shows she can still whip butt with the best of them, helping to defeat both Syndrome and the Screenslaver.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

After being shot out of the sky, Helen Parr transforms into a parachute to safely deliver herself and her kids into the sea, after which she threatens to ground both the kids unless they calm down before morphing into a dingy to get them safely to land.

Talk about multi-tasking skills!

Mrs Edna Turnblad

Aka: Tracy’s mum

Movie: Hairspray

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Big, bold and beautiful Edna Turnblad is the mum we’re all rooting for as her life turns from shut-in to show off in the movie Hairspray. Always played in Drag, Edna Turnblad is one yummy mummy we just love to love.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

The Mr Pinky’s Hefty Hideaway makeover of course. In both the original and the 2007 movie version these scenes are pure mummy magic.

Lilly Potter

Aka: Harry’s mum

Movie: Harry Potter

When it comes to giving it all up for your kids, Lilly Potter wins hands down. Not only did she stand up to he-who-must-not-be-named to save her son, but she also armed him with everything he’d need to take Voldemort down in the end, including making Harry the last Horcrux by default.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

When Lily cast herself in front of the Avada Kedavra curse meant to kill Harry, deflecting it back on him and permanently weakening him forever.

Jeanine Stifler

Aka: Stifler’s Mum

Aka: MILF

Movie: American Pie Series

Only a son like Steve Stifler could come from a mum like Jeanine. A no-nonsense hottie whose presence in the movie serves only to give Finch a hold over her own son.

When Stifler’s mum seduces Finch, she gives him the night of his life and sets the standard to which he’ll hold all future encounters to measure.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

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Karen

Aka: Daisy and Bernie’s mum

Movie: Love Actually

The woman who made other women across the world temporarily despise Alan Rickman, Karen is the perfect mother, who lives for her children and sacrifices her own dreams for a happy family home.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

Karen: The trouble with being the Prime Minister’s sister is, it does put your life into rather harsh perspective. What did my brother do today? He stood up and fought for his country. And what did I do? I made a papier maché lobster head.

Andy’s Mum

Aka: Emily (fan theory)

Movie: The Toy Story Series

If there’s one mum whose shown she can handle it all its Andy’s mum. As any mother knows the loss or breakage of a favourite toy can be catastrophic and yet she brushes it off pulling out other distractions like Pizza Planet and puppies.

Only once did we see her lose her cool when Andy . . . sob. . . left for college. Andy’s mum is one tough cookie.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

A fan theory that makes Andy’s Mum Jessie’s original owner, Emily.

Minds blown!

Mrs McAllister

Aka: Kevin’s mum

Movie: Home Alone 1 & 2

Every mum’s worst nightmare is leaving something important at home on route to the airport for a family getaway. Leaving a child behind, unthinkable. Twice, unforgivable.

But of course, we know that what ensues are two of the greatest family movies ever made.

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What we love about Mrs McAllister is in both movies she will stop at nothing to get back to her boy, including traversing the country in the back of a van and wandering the scary streets of New York City alone.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

In the second movie when Mrs McAllister realises she knows exactly where Kevin will be, and they are reunited under the huge Christmas tree. Weep.

Norma Bates

Aka: Norman’s mum

Movie: Psycho

The mother of all mother movies is Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho. The twisted relationship between Norma and Norman is one that is still referenced today in many psychological thrillers. Psycho’s Norma Bates takes the overbearing mother figure to a whole new level.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

When Mrs Bates’ corpse is found in the cellar and Norman appears dressed as her wielding a knife, one of the greatest cinematic reveals of all time.

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Ellen Ripley

Aka: The Mother of the Alien Queen

Movie: Alien 3 & Alien Resurrection

Before Khalissi, Mother of Dragons there was Ripley mother of Aliens. After birthing a creature that only a mother could love, this kick-ass mum is forced to kill her offspring in not one but two Alien movies

Our favourite mom movie moment:

Trapped on the fleeing ship in Alien Resurrection, Ripley’s half human, half alien offspring has killed a few more cast members.

Ripley gets all maternal, cuddling the creature before using her own blood to melt a hole in the glass window and then watches her alien child get sucked out into space!

The Other Mother

Aka: Coraline’s other mum

Movie: Coraline

Sometimes our own mothers can seem a little boring or too busy to pay us attention, that’s where the other mothers come in. But of course, no mother is better than the one you’ve already got, as Coraline found out the hard way.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

When Coraline’s mum buys her the gloves she asked for in the early scenes and shows she was listening all along.

Donna Sheridan

Aka: Sophie’s mum

Movie: Mamma Mia

The coolest movie mum ever has to be Donna Sheridan, who single-handedly raised her daughter on a stunning Greek island after leaving her friends, bandmates and musical career behind.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

When Donna is helping Sophie get ready for her wedding, recounting all the fun times she had to the song “Slipping through my fingers” by ABBA.

Evelyn O’Connell

Aka: Alex’s mum

Movie: The Mummy Returns

Not only did Evelyn O’Connell battle an undead Mummy, but she also took on a reincarnated Egyptian warrior Princess to save her son and husband from the clutches of the Scorpion King and came back from the dead to do it.

That’s dedication.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

When battling a soldier from the army of Anaksunamun, Evelyn’s son Alex asks his mum “Wow mum where did you learn that?”, to which she replies I have no idea.

Then, throwing out a powerful right hook knocking a soldier out, she tells Alex “That I learned from your father.”

Elizabeth James

Aka: Annie and Hallie’s mum

Movie: The Parent Trap

Parent Trap

The effortlessly stylish and successful Elizabeth James seems like the perfect role model for little Annie and her estranged twin sister Hallie. She also has a clumsy endearing quality which makes us love her all the more.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

When Elizabeth is packing to swap Annie and Hallie back, pacing her room smoking a cigarette, with a roller in her hair and sunglasses on have a mini meltdown. Relatable.

Maria Von Trapp

Aka: Gretl, Marta, Kurt, Brigitta, Louisa, Frederich and Leisl’s mum

Movie: The Sound of Music

A woman who would never become a nun instead became the mother of 7 children in war-torn Austria, saving them all from Nazi rule with the Sound of Music and a good healthy hike into the hills.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

When all the Von Trapp kids huddle up in Maria’s bed during the thunderstorm and sing about their favourite things to feel better.

Mama Fratelli

Aka: Mikey, Jake and Sloth’s mum

Movie: The Goonies

One of the worst mums on the list, Mama Fratelli was a mum you would never mess with. She kept her two of her sons in check with frequent beatings and kept the other locked in chains his whole life!

Our favourite mom movie moment:

Mama Fratelli: You remember that song I used to sing to you?

Sloth: Yeah!

Mama Fratelli: You were little back then?

Mama Fratelli: Rock-a-bye baby on the tree top. When the wind blows the cradle will rock. When the bough breaks the cradle will fall…

Sloth: Break! Fall!

Mama Fratelli: No! I only dropped once.

Sloth: Ahh!

Mama Fratelli: Well, maybe twice. No Sloth! Put me down!

Beverly Sutphin

Aka: Misty and Chip’s mum

Movie: Serial Mom

As far as mad movie mums go, Beverly Sutphin takes the cake. Why do we love her? Because she’ll do anything to keep her kids happy, including murder their teachers.

Our favourite mum movie moment:

Chip: So happy I could s**t.

Beverly: Chip! You know how I hate the brown word.

Maureen Prescott

Aka: Sydney’s mum

Movie: Scream Series

It’s well known that if it weren’t for Sydney’s mum, the Scream franchise would never have happened. So, even though Sydney might not thank her mum for years of dodging psychotic serial killers, we certainly do.

Our favourite mom movie moment:

When the ghost of Maureen comes to haunt Sydney in her dreams. As if she hasn’t caused her enough trouble already. Gorsh!

What a wonderful array of mom movie moments, from the magical and heartwarming to the terrifying and slightly disturbing.

Mother’s Day at Arthouse Hotel

If you are hoping to spoil your mum this Mother’s Day, why not treat to a night at Arthouse Hotel? Here she can enjoy an overnight stay in utter luxury surrounded by movie inspired decor and indulgent facilities.

Hitchcock Arthouse Hotel - mom movie moments

What’s more, Sunday’s in Mulholland Singing Diner, are filled with pure Disney magic and classic show tune entertainment provided by our live singing waiters. If your mum loves her musicals Mulholland and Arthouse Hotel are the place for you this Mother’s Day in Liverpool.

Take a dip in the double whirlpool baths, enjoy a meal at the nearby Alma de Cuba or explore the nearby nightlife with your very own “cool mom”. Call on 0151 236 0166 or email info@signatureliving.co.uk to arrange your Mother’s Day visit.

Feel-Good Movies for the January Blues

Despite our endeavors, January is probably not the most exciting month of the year; although it is the darkest, coldest and grimmest. Christmas is over, the decorations are down and everyone is drudging back into work one miserable step at a time. The January blues are certainly upon us in 2019.

Having said that, we thought we’d share with you our pick of the best feel-good movies to get you out of the post-Christmas slump.

The Pursuit of Happyness | 2006

The Pursuit of Happyness is feel-good personified. I mean, it even has the word ‘happyness’ in the title – although it is spelt wrong.

Directed by Gabriele Muccino, The Pursuit of Happyness is a must for those who are devoid of motivation in January. This feel-good movie is about a young man who, in the throes of homelessness, is trying to raise his son.

Armed with a slew of instagramable motivational quotes, ideal for helping you out of bed in the morning – the foremost being: “if you want something go get it” – The Pursuit of Happyness is as feel-good as it is heartwarming.

Grease | 1978

Memorable showtunes and magnificent dance moves: two of the reasons why Grease is the ideal feel-good movie for banishing the January blues. The most dubious ‘teenagers’ ever go a long way to have you dancing the gloom away.

Featuring on our pick of the greatest teen movies that changed pop culture forever, Grease is guaranteed to have you popping your hood like Travolta as the rain crashes down on your way to work in January.

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Paramount Pictures

Another sure way to banish the blues this January is by staying in our stunning, Grease-themed room at the amazing Arthouse Hotel. You can guarantee you’re in for an exciting stay, as our room has been furnished to celebrate the hit 1978 musical.

Shape yourself up this January, you wont regret it.

500 Days of Summer | 2009

Now we know that 500 Days of Summer isn’t the happiest of happy movies, however, we believe it echoes everyone’s mood in January; not wanting to get out bed in the morning being one of them.

Indeed, this bubbling volcano of romance, comedy and everything inbetween is worthy of any January viewing on the bluest of blue days.

La La Land | 2016

La La Land is a technicolour behemoth of choreographed dance routines and musical numbers that are bound to banish the January blues.

The movie opens on a dreary overpass, and – in one swooping take – we find ourselves in the midst of a feel-good movie bursting with charm.

Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone are awesome in La La Land as it is preposterous, ludicrous – and exactly the movie we need in January.

Mrs. Doubtfire | 1993

Released in 1993, Mrs. Doubtfire is a transvestic cauldron of madness about a man impersonating a nanny from Scotland and therefore ideal for January, when everyone could do with a laugh.

This feel-good movie is sure to have you laughing one minute and weeping the next, but don’t fear, it is wrapped up in a heartwarming bow at the end.

Mrs. Doubtfire, like The Pursuit of Happyness – and each and every one of our movies – is feel-good personified.

Arthouse Hotel

feel-good movie

As you’ve probably already guessed, we love the movies here at Arthouse Hotel.

So, why don’t you bring the entire family together and take advantage of our awesome hotel and movie-inspired rooms that wouldn’t look out of place in some of the marvelous movies listed above.

Come and join us! We’d love to hear from you today to organise a magical stay at Arthouse in 2019.

You can contact us on 0151 601 8801

Our Guide to the Best Movies of 2018

In 2018, a selection of stellar movies has showed that, regardless of genre, excellence abounds at the cinema.

In this modern cinematic era, you’d think that the visceral experience of going to the movies, buying popcorn and, extreme I know, putting your phone away, would be under threat. However, rather than retreating in dismay, cinema – notably in 2018 – has come out swinging in a Rocky Balboa-esc blaze of glory.

So, with a month to go until the calendar turns, we thought we’d share with you our picks for the best movies of 2018.

Bohemian Rhapsody

This long-awaited biopic is a foot-stomping celebration of Queen, their music and their iconic mustachioed frontman – one of, if not the greatest entertainer ever to grace a stage.

The movie chronicles the years preceding Queen’s legendary performance at Live Aid in 1985 where Mercury, played by Rami Malek – who replaced Sacha Baron Cohen in July 2013 – led the band in one of the most iconic performances in music history.

Bohemian Rhapsody does, however, have its shortcomings – its tameness being one of them. Mercury lived a dramatic, hedonistic existence which doesn’t come through in the movie.

Nevertheless, the biopic regains its best-movie status when Mercury, in all his pomp and pageantry, performs at Live Aid in front of 72,000 computer-generated people.

A Prayer Before Dawn

A Prayer Before Dawn isn’t for everyone nor is it one to gather the family for, however, Joe Cole’s ferocious yet unblemished performance is one that transforms actors into megastars.

Jean-Stéphane Sauvaire’s reworking of boxer William Moore’s 2014 memoir that documents the three years he spent in the infamous Bangkok Hilton – Thailand’s toughest prison – is a primal masterpiece.

Cole is at home in Liverpool when recording Peaky Blinders; the period drama of which he is most known, however, in A Prayer Before Dawn – which was largely shot on location in Klong Prem Prison – he couldn’t be any more removed.

This bubbling volcano of a movie is worthy of being one of 2018s best pictures.

A Star is Born

Renowned movie expert and, aptly, musician Mark Kermode summed up A Star is Born in the opening sentence of his October review: “a timeless tale,” he hollered.

This maxim works wonderfully to describe this movie which, is most certainly timeless. Not only was this picture one of the best, but it was also one of the biggest, grossing £152,518,456 worldwide.

In A Star is Born we have Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga: the former making his directorial bow, the latter in her big-screen debut and, whilst Cooper is awesomely assured behind the camera, it is Gaga who stands out; a star is truly born.

On reflection, A Star is Born may be the best movie of 2018.

Black Panther

The newest big-screen superhero story is both an uproarious adventure and success.

Showcasing Chadwick Boseman as Black Panther and Michael B. Jordan as N’Jadaka, this Marvel masterpiece is a staple of 2018 cinema viewing. Visually handsome with a captivating plot to match, Black Panther is not only a good superhero movie, but it is also a good movie in general.

Not wanting to ignore the important themes the movie tackles Black Panther, subsequently, paved the way for future superhero movies in 2018 and, therefore, is deserving of a place on our list.

Crazy Rich Asians

Like Black Panther, Crazy Rich Asians is a watershed moment for Hollywood.

Directed by Jon M Chu, Crazy Rich Asians follows native New Yorker Rachel Chu who journeys to Singapore to meet her spouses’ kin. Nevertheless, like every rom-com ever, there’s an adorable twist. Rachel’s boyfriend is from one of China’s most moneyed families and shock, Rachel doesn’t know.

Normally, a movie such as this wouldn’t pop up on a list like ours, however, Crazy Rich Asians is a lesson on how to both cast a movie and adapt a best-selling novel.

Lady Bird

Lady Bird is a movie overflowing with warmth, humour and sadness that manages to feel current despite the “overly stacked nature” of the teenage-angst genre.

This evocative performance by Saoirse Ronan as Christine “Lady Bird” McPherson is deserving of acclaim and award; however, it is Greta Gerwig’s absorbing screenplay and spectacular directorship that empowers this movie.

Arthouse Hotel

best movies

At Arthouse Hotel, we have an array of amazing offers for celebrating Christmas & New Year in Liverpool.

Bring the whole family together and take advantage of our excellent facilities and movie-inspired rooms that wouldn’t look strange in some of the marvellous movies listed above.

So, come and join us! We’d love to hear from you today to organise a magical stay at Arthouse.

You can contact us on 0151 601 8801

Best Teen Movies That Changed Pop Culture Forever

Ariana Grande pretty much broke the internet after she released the much-anticipated video for her self-love anthem ‘Thank U, Next’. The video is the actual millennial dream with multiple cultural references to various noughties films, leaving us feeling inspired…and unbelievably jealous of that Elle Woods outfit.

So, after much thought and deliberation, here is our round up some of our favourite teen movies – all of which we feel have changed pop culture (and our lives) forever.

Mean Girls (2004)

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Now, this film was a game-changer, and it’s no wonder it was included in Ariana’s video. At the time of release, Lindsay Lohan was the it-girl of ’04. SO fetch. A painfully accurate depiction of American high school politics, Mean Girls also managed to resonate with UK audiences with its brutal but hilarious portrayal of teen angst, awkwardness and social hierarchy.

On top of all that social commentary are also some of the most quotable lines of this day and age. It’s a well-known fact that on Wednesdays we wear pink. We are constantly haunted by the age-old question: IS butter a carb? You go, Glen Coco!

Honestly, we could go on for hours.

Superbad (2007)

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Ah, Superbad. A timeless, modern classic. No seriously! Eleven years later, it still resonates with us. In a similar way to Mean Girls, the film deals with the realities of young adulthood whilst still managing to be a comedy goldmine.

The film makes sure to constantly remind us how the struggle really is real when you’re an uncomfortable, confused & ridiculously hormonal adolescent. This film set itself apart from its immature – and pretty terrible – predecessors, and led the way for a new generation of teen movies.

McLovin’ is the hero we never knew we needed.

Legally Blonde (2001)

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Bennnd…and snap! With one of the most incredible aesthetics of all time, Legally Blonde is easily one of the best teen movies out there. Elle Woods shows the world that despite the fact you love a bit of pink leather, have a penchant for fluffy stationery and pretty much live the life of a high fashion Barbie – you can still become a kick-ass lawyer and prove that idiot of an ex-boyfriend wrong.

Legally Blonde served to break stereotypes and pave the way for a new kind of role model for girls. A career woman AND a fashion icon? Yas!

Princess Diaries (2001)

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One of our favourite makeover montages. Hands down. And that’s all we have to say on the matter.

Bring It On (2000)

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Brr, it’s cold in here! There must be some Toros in the atmosphere! Bring It On taught us the all-important difference between jazz hands and spirit fingers. For teens living in the UK, the concept of cheerleaders alone was fascinating.

By the end of the film, you’d end up attempting a back-handspring-basket-toss-arabesque-cradle-catch off the couch then spend the rest of the night sulking in your room ‘cos you fell into the telly.

Grease (1978)

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Featuring one of history’s biggest glow-ups in the form of Sandy and her high-waisted satin pants, Grease is easily one of the most memorable teen movies out there. It might be 40 years old, but it still stands as a firm favourite in our eyes.

The ‘teenagers’ in this cult classic definitely look just as old as the movie and we continue to be baffled by how we didn’t clock all that risque subject matter, but we just don’t care. Catchy show tunes, infectious dance moves and let’s face it, young John Travolta as Danny Zuko, Grease is one the best teen movies ever made. If you’re a musical mogul, then we definitely recommend checking out the best theatre in Liverpool this year. Plus, if you see yourself as a Pink Lady or T-Bird, book a stay in our Grease themed room at Arthouse. You’re born to hand-jive, baby!

As you can tell, we love all things movies here at Arthouse Hotel. Sound like your cup of tea? Why not come and pay us a visit! Make your reservation to stay at The Arthouse Hotel today.

Movie Diners | The Most Famous American Diners on Screen

With their chrome counters, bubble-gum chewing waitresses and menus filled with classic American delights of key lime pie, fluffy pancakes and plenty of filter coffee, the diner is an icon of state-side culture.

Not unlike a British pub, the humble diner is a staple of American life. It’s no wonder they pop up in all genres of American movies from cult classics, to comedies and even our favourite rom-coms.

From the Frosty Palace in Grease to Jack Rabbit Slim’s in Pulp Fiction, diners have been the backdrop for some of the most famous scenes in movie history. And with the opening of Arthouse’s new diner experience in the centre of Liverpool, we though we’d take a deep dive into some classic movie diners we all love seeing on-screen.

Open now, Mulholland offers a brand new singing waiter diner experience, where you can enjoy fantastic US-inspired food and drink with a musical accompaniment of all the best power ballads, movies hits and musical showstoppers. From indulgent milkshakes to rainbows nachos and sizzling hot-dogs, it’s the ultimate Hollywood hangout.

But to get you in the mood for some diner-excellence, let’s take a look at the most iconic burger joints in movie history. These are our favourite movie diners on screen…

Pulp Fiction’s Double Trouble Diners

Who hasn’t wished they could visit the fictional diner of Jack Rabbit Slim’s in Pulp Fiction? With it’s slot car race tracks, classic-car shaped booths and waiting staff dressed as Hollywood stars, we all wanted to take Mia Wallace out for a meal at this “wax museum with a pulse” (Vincent’s words, not ours). And of course, it’s the location of that very famous dance…

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But Slim’s wasn’t the only diner that made it into this cult classic. Who could forget the iconic opening (and closing) scenes set in a bog-standard US diner with Pumpkin and Honey Bunny? Tarantino’s love-letter to pop culture found the perfect setting to start the film inside America’s favourite dining establishment.

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The Frosty Palace in Grease

Rydell High students’ favourite out-of-school hangout might not have technically been a diner but we all still call it one. Officially a ‘malt shop’, this icy palace looked like a classic, old-school diner to the untrained eye, with its uniformed waitresses, 50s chromatic furnishings and menu of fries, shakes and burgers (always with not enough ketchup).

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But whether a diner or not, it undoubtedly makes the list of the most famous movie diners on screen thanks to the iconic Beauty School Dropout musical number that took place within its tiled walls, as well as all the Sandy-Danny dates that went to disasterously wrong at its tables.

Call yourself a Grease mega-fan? Why not stay in Arthouse’s incredible Grease suite for a (summer) night you’ll never forget. Sleeping up to six guests, with luxurious amenities including kitchenette, large-screen TV and a whirlpool bath, you’ll have the chills and they’ll be multiplyin’ when you book this incredible movie suite in Liverpool’s city centre.

The Diner in The Big Lebowski that’s More Famous than the Film

You might recognize the movie diner spotted in The Big Lebowski – it’s a bit of a location star. Featuring in numerous mega movies, music videos and TV shows, including Reservoir Dogs, Gone in 60 Seconds and the video for Sean Kington’s top hit ‘Beautiful Girls’, it’s arguably had more success than most of the actors who’ve filmed inside it.

The diner was, at the time of filming The Big Lebowski, still an operating diner called Johnie’s Coffee Shop Restaurant. Today, it’s only used as a filming location but you can still see visit the iconic exterior on Wilshire Boulevard in midtown Los Angeles.

Blade Runner’s Futuristic Food Establishment

Again, not a traditional diner, but the noodle bar in Blade Runner offers a 1980s interpretation of what an LA diner in 2019 might look like and it sure is iconic.

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The cramped chrome-clad restaurant with its steaming bowls of broth and unsociable customers still provides weary travellers and hungry cliental the same classic American service that a traditional diner does – just with a significantly Japanese twist.

And anyway, it’s one of the best examples of the film’s incredible set design that looked seriously futuristic but still recognizable as downtown LA.

The Home-From-Home Diner in Pineapple Express

One of Hollywood’s best loved bromance comedies, Pineapple Express puts the American diner to good use in its closing scenes. Like all best friends, Dale, Saul and Red end the movie with a classic diner breakfast – eggs, bacon and plenty of coffee – while rehashing their action-packed night before.

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There’s no fancy 50s-style thrills here – director David Gordon Green made sure the movie diner was a bog-standed US food stop, perfect for a greasy food fix after a night running away from mobsters and corrupt police officers.

The Notorious Goodfellas Diner

When Martin Scorsese was looking for a location to film his then titled ‘Wiseguy’, his eyes settled on a small, space-age style diner in Maspeth, Queens (New York City).

Then called the Clinton diner, it was owned by Dimitra and Michael Diamantis who were about to see their small establishment become a famous tourist hotspot, with avid fans including the late Philip Seymour Hoffman and Pierce Brosnan heading to the location to grab a selfie and experience the atmosphere.

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The movie, of course, was the legendary Goodfellas, which filmed two of its most memorable scenes inside the diner, making the Diamanti’s family business one of the most famous diners in movie history. The famous phone-bashing scene was set at a phone booth outside the diner.

Lou’s Cafe in Back to the Future

Who could forgot Marty’s famous trip to Lou’s Café in Back to the Future? This perfect example of a 1955 diner was where Marty first realizes how different the past can be after attempting to order a Pepsi Free and being told by an irate server “You want a Pepsi, pal, you gotta pay for it”.

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An integral location in the film, Lou’s is undoubtedly one of Hollywood’s most iconic movie diners, with it’s minty colour scheme and retro interiors.

The History Behind American Diners

They’ve been a stable of American culture for over a generation, but did you know that the very first food diners had wheels?

The word diner can officially be defined (according to Webster’s Dictionary) as ‘a restaurant in the shape of a railroad car’, harking back to the origins of these classic US food-spots.

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A classic 1950s diner in New Jersey. Credit: Wiki Commons | Jaboyce

Back in the 1800s, the first iteration of diners were called ‘lunch cars’ and we can thank Rhode Island’s Water Scott for their invention. Scott re-purposed a horse-pulled wagon into a cart that served sandwiches, coffee, pies and eggs to people heading home at night and his side-line hustle was so successful that he ended up quitting his day job to sell food from the wagon all-day, everyday. Soon, other companies followed suit.

Buoyed by the success of these businesses, T.H. Buckley from Massachusetts decided that manufacturing purpose-build ‘lunch cars’ was more profitable than doing the actual food selling. He started the Worcester Lunch Car Company which produced ‘dining cars’ fitted with basic stoves and an ice box for foodie entrepreneurs. Soon, these portable cars were popping up all over America, offering food to weary travellers and tired workers.

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One of the classic Worcester Lunch Cars in Somerville, Massachusetts. Credit: Wiki Commons | Vistawhite

But as the number of lunch cars jumped higher, many towns and cities passed civil laws restricting their hours of operation. Attempting to loophole these restrictions, lunch car owners started permanently parking up their cars in busy locations and the diner as we know it was born.

By 1913, the idea was really starting to catch on and Jerry O’Mahoney established the first ever purpose-built stationary diner in the United States. He would go on to become the largest manufacturer of diners ever, producing a rumored 2,000 diners between 1917 and 1941 across the country.

As the years ticked by, the traditional diner became more and more extravagant and by the time the 1950s hit, the stream-lined silver space age carriages were all the range, cementing what we all now think of when someone says the word ‘diner’.

Visit the UK’s Only Singing Waiter Diner Today

To celebrate the launch of the UK’s only singing waiter diner at Arthouse Hotel, we’re offering you the chance to get 50% off all food at the newly opened Mulholland bar for this month only!

Enjoy out-of-this-world milkshakes, Spice Girl-inspired pizzas, rainbow nachos and much, much more  all for half price this October by showing this Facebook voucher on ordering.

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A magical eating experience like no other in Liverpool, our musical-minded singing waiters will serenade you with classic ballads, musical showstoppers and movie top hits, transporting you straight to LA and the silver screen musical numbers we all love so much.

Make sure you’re following Mulholland on all our social media channels to keep updated on all the lastest news, competitions and offers from this incredible new eating experience. We’e hanging out on Facebook and Instagram.  Be our guest and join us today at the brand-new Mulholland!

The Best Autumn Movies for a Cosy Night In this Season

There’s an autumn chill in the air and that calls for plenty of cosy film nights! If you’re stuck for what to watch, we’ve compiled a go-to list of some of the best autumn movies of all time.

Arthouse Hotel is the perfect spot to bring friends together for the ultimate autumn night in. So, why not enjoy a spectacular group stay at the most unique hotel in Liverpool?

The Best Autumn Movies

You’ve Got Mail (1998)

You’ve Got Mail is without a doubt one one of the best autumn movies of all time. Witten and directed by Nora Ephron, this cosy film captures the feel-good essence of 90s nostalgia.

Find yourself immersed in the story of Joe Fox (Tom Hanks) and Sally Albright (Meg Ryan) as they exchange anonymous thoughts via dial-up internet and simultaneously cross paths on the streets of New York.

Harvesting the back-to-school season with one memorable line, Tom Hanks reads: “Don’t you love New York in the fall? It makes me want to buy school supplies. I would send you a bouquet of newly sharpened pencils if I knew your name and address.”

When Harry Met Sally (1989)

Arguably Nora Ephron’s most famous film, When Harry Met Sally is another autumnal gem, perfect for a lazy Sunday with a mug of hot chocolate. Get ready to be charmed by this mismatched duo as they stroll the leafy streets of Central Park to a truly charming soundtrack.

Not forgetting, Harry and Sally showcase a flawless autumn wardrobe. From cosy knitwear and roll-neck jumpers to stylish bowler hats, this iconic movie is sure to leave you with plenty of outfit ideas.

Good Will Hunting (1997)

Good Will Hunting is a must-watch for your autumn movies list. Starring Matt Damon alongside the late Robin Williams, this triumphant tale won an impressive 5 awards at the 1998 Academy Awards.

Prepare for plenty of words of wisdom as inspiring therapist (Williams) attempts to treat a young genius (Damon) amidst the scenic Boston foliage.

The Harry Potter Franchise

A day of autumn movies wouldn’t be complete without a sprinkle of Hogwarts magic. The Harry Potter franchise is perfect for binge watching on a rainy day this October and November.

Literally showcasing the back-to-school feeling, Harry Potter has it all. From knitted jumpers and candlelit pumpkins to woodland adventures, revisiting Harry Potter is a must for this autumn.

Hocus Pocus (1993)

Creating an enchanting autumn backdrop, this Disney classic invite you to the mystical town of Salem. A family favourite for the autumn season, Hocus Pocus tells the tale of the Sanderson sisters.

The 3 mischievous witches are accidentally brought back to life, and with their immortality at stake, this fun-filled adventure is sure to keep you hooked!

 Offers in Liverpool – Arthouse Hotel

At Arthouse Hotel, we have a range of fantastic offers for spending autumn in Liverpool in style. Bring your nearest and dearest together for a cosy stay in the heart of Liverpool city centre.

autumn movies

You can look forward to making the most of our indulgent facilities and atmospheric movie-themed rooms. Our glamorous Psycho room and weird and wonderful Rocky Horror Show room are particular favourites over the Halloween period.

So, what are you waiting for? We’d love to hear from you today to plan an unforgettable stay with us! You can reach us on 0151 601 8801.

All About Alfred Hitchcock

Alfred Hitchcock is undeniably one of the world’s most famous and influential directors of all time. From Birds to Psycho to Vertigo, it is hard to find someone who hasn’t seen at least one of ‘The Master of Suspense’s films. As we approach the anniversary of the legendary director’s death, nearly 40 years ago on April 29th 1980, we take a look back on all things Alfred Hitchcock.

He was celebrated throughout the cinematic world for his distinctly recognisable directorial style, with shots framed to maximise the feeling of unease within his viewers, creating a sense of fear, dread or anxiety in his innovative forms of film editing.

It was this iconic style that earned him his ‘Master of Suspense’ title and paved the way for Hitchcock’s pioneering evolution of the thriller genre.

Alfred Hitchcock

The Early Life of an Icon

Born to a William Hitchcock, a greengrocer in Leytonstone in 1899, Alfred Joseph Hitchcock was the second son and youngest of three children. Often found drawing and inventing games in his spare time, he was quiet and described as a bit of a loner – a trait that was mainly due to his size, which was large even as a child.

A story often told about Hitchcock’s upbringing, and the subsequent influence on his life and career is the story of Hitchcock’s time spent in prison.

When he was five years old, Hitchcock’s very strict, Catholic father punished the young boy for being naughty by sending him to the local police station with a note, asking the officers to lock him away for several minutes. This was Hitchcock’s only brush with the law, thanks to a deep-seated fear of authority because of this very moment.

After graduating from London County Council School of Engineering and Navigation, with fantastic draftsmanship skills under his belt, Hitchcock took a job at Henley Telegraph Company as an estimator for their manufacture of electric cable.

With a job he saw as mind-numbing, Hitchcock used his free time to attend the cinema (often by himself0, read cinema trade papers and take drawing classes at London University. This creative side shone through in Henley’s Social Club magazine, where his short stories with twist endings and caricatures were published. These published works got Hitchcock promoted to the advertising department, as a creative advertising illustrator.

The Birth of a Director

Hitchcock’s first endeavour into film was a job as a title card designer (the text in silent movies that explains actions or shows dialogue) for Famous Players-Lasky (which later became Paramount). He used this job to get his foot in the door for screenwriting, assistant director, set designer and all other aspects of filmmaking.

After a few failed attempts at directing while at Famous Players-Lasky, during which he met his future wife, Alma, Hitchcock scored a hit with The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog in 1927. The film was a major success in the United Kingdom and is regarded as the first ‘Hitchcockian’ film, heavily influenced by expressionist techniques that Hitchcock witnessed while directing The Pleasure Garden in Germany in 1926.

The 1930s saw Hitchcock make film after film, with many becoming a success both on home soil and across the Atlantic in America. His 1938 film The Lady Vanishes, won the New York Critics’ Award for Best Film, which helped catch the attention of American film producer and studio owner David O. Selznick, who extended a contract offer of three motion picture films. Hitchcock accepted and moved his now wife Alma, and ten-year-old daughter Patricia, to Hollywood.

Alfred Hitchcock and David O. Selznick

Iconic Films

Hitchcock was one of the first directors to which the ‘auteur theory was applied, a theory which stresses the artistic authority of the director in the filmmaking process. Such artistry is what contributed to so many of Hitchcock’s films being regarded with such icon status.

Perhaps the most well-known film from Hitchcock didn’t come until later in his career, Psycho, released in 1960, was the most shocking film of its time. With twists and disturbing themes that thrilled moviegoers across the world. The cheap budget ($800,000) gave Hitchcock motivation to be creative with his filming techniques, to such an extent that the now iconic shower scene, where the heroine is brutally murdered, is composed of more than 90 shots and 70 different angles. The scene is revered as one of the most thrilling pieces of work of all time.

Janet Leigh in Psycho, Alfred Hitchcock

Keeping with his later fashion of one-word titles and suspenseful thrillers, Hitchcock’s other most memorable films, which hold permanent places on the majority of ‘Top Films’ lists, includes Birds (1963), where a town is attacked by menacing flocks of birds, and Vertigo (1958), a story of obsession, manipulation and fear and a cycle of madness and lies.

The endless list of classics produced by the Master of Suspense is one of the many reasons he is considered to be one of, if not the, best directors of all time.

Hidden Gems

Not to be ignored are Hitchcock’s lesser known films, iconic in their own right, but often overshadowed by is creative giants. Early works such as Notorious (1946), Spellbound (1945) and The 39 Steps (1935) all have their place in film history for their technical ingenuity.

With more than 50 feature films under his belt throughout his career, there is a plethora of hidden and niche Hitchcock films that document his development to the style he was admired for.

Aesthetic

Often cited as a pioneer and auteur, Hitchcock’s filming style is what places him in the director’s hall of fame, with signature filming techniques and styles that help identify any of his films as distinctly Hitchcockian.

He appears as a cameo in 39 of his films, often with no lines and as a brief background character in early scenes. The tradition began When filming his first major success, The Lodger (1927), when there weren’t enough extras to fill the newsroom in the opening scene.

Alfred Hitchock's cameo in Rear Window

Certain camera angles and techniques have become associated with the director’s feature films, as he creates a feel of voyeurism for the audience, with point of view shots and roving tracking to guide the audience to the subject at hand.

Hitchcock also gained a reputation for using ‘icy blondes’ as his chosen heroines, from Grace Kelly to Janet Leigh to Ingrid Bergman. He once said that blondes are thought to be innocent and glamorous – the perfect recipe for a victim. The icy attitude was for added suspense, and to confuse the audience with their lack of empathy for the poor femme fatale.

He was also noted for his rigorous planning of his productions, with every detail of every scene meticulously storyboarded, with every camera angle, sound effect and movement accounted for and unchanged throughout the filming process.

Personal Life

Hitchcock met his wife, Alma, while working at his first studio, Famous Players-Lasky. She worked on continuity and editing for several of his early works and the two were married in 1926 and she became his chief collaborator on all films. Alma took a backseat to the limelight as she did not want the public attention that came with her husband’s rise to fame.

The couple welcomed their first and only child, a girl named Patricia, in 1928, and the entire family moved to Hollywood when David O. Selznick offered Hitchcock a three-film contract in March 1939.

hitchcock behind the scenes

Awards, Honours and Death

Being one of the most well-noted directors in history comes with a string of awards and honours across a lifetime of hard work and dedication to the industry. Along with innumerable Oscar, Golden Globes and BAFTA nominations and awards, Hitchcock also received five lifetime achievement awards, eight Laurel Awards and has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Hitchcock became Sir Alfred Hitchcock after being knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in the 1980 New Year Honours.

In the first few months after his knighthood, Hitchcock worked on a script for a new spy thriller, The Short Night, but the project never came to fruition due to the director’s rapidly declining health. In April of 1980, he passed away in his home of renal failure at 80 years old.

The Hitchcock Floor at Arthouse Hotel

Arthouse Hotel, close to Liverpool’s city centre and just minutes walk to the vibrant and ever-growing nightlife, pay special homage to Hitchcock’s legacy and the impact he left on the cinematic world with an entire floor dedicated to his most iconic films.

Choose from eight Hitchcock themed rooms, sleeping between four and six guests, and indulge in the luxury of a bygone era of cinema.

Spellbound room at Arthouse Hotel

Experience an elegant take on Bates Motel in Pyscho, or indulge in Notorious, there’s glamour in Suspicion and dark decadence in The Birds.

Be enchanted in Spellbound or experience life on the run in Stage Fright, there’s also the mystifying magnetism of Vertigo and a 1920s vibe in Easy Virtue.

There’s stylish accommodation for everyone whatever your favourite Hitchcock film, and with an amazing location in the heart of cultural Liverpool, there is no better place for group accommodation that the Arthouse Hotel.

Call on 0151 601 8801 or email info@signatureliving.co.uk to book your stay at Liverpool’s best movie theme hotel.